Our Statement on Juneteenth

As an abortion fund, our staff and board members understand that racial justice is central to a vision of reproductive justice. We affirm Black humanity and celebrate Black freedom. Thus, we observe the celebration of Juneteenth, which recognizes the day in 1865 when enslaved Blacks in Galveston, Texas learned of their emancipation, two and one-half years after it had been decreed.

Juneteenth is a day to celebrate the progress our country had made toward Black freedom as well as a time to reflect upon the unfulfilled promises of Black liberation struggles. The incidence of police brutality against the demonstrators at the Stonewall Columbus Pride Parade (LINK to #blackpride4 legal fund) this past weekend illuminate the continual devaluation of Black life. The protest was designed to draw attention to the acquittal of the Minnesota police officer who killed Philando Castile and to highlight the interconnectedness of anti-oppression work as LBTQIA issues are Black Lives Matter issues. And both are reproductive justice and Women Have Options issues. Anti-oppression work is difficult; it is connected, and it is necessary. We have a lot of work to do. We ask you to stand with us as we work to fight for justice, while celebrating the rich legacy of the African American experience this June 19th.

Former Texas Slaves Celebrating Juneteenth in Austin, ca. 1900 Image Ownership: Public Domain - See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/perspectives/juneteenth-birth-african-american-holiday#sthash.7XX7eWka.dpuf

Former Texas Slaves Celebrating Juneteenth in Austin, ca. 1900
Image Ownership: Public Domain